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Guadeloupe
Spend the morning on the narrow paths between ancient rainforests and waterfalls. Let later the tired legs resting on the beach with your toes in the Caribbean Sea. Take the small ferry to the island of Terre-de-Haut when dusk comes creeping, and pamper your taste buds with grilled lobster and giant crab with chili and lime. For night owls there are plenty of local scope to extend the night with several hours.

Guadeloupe is a French overseas department and region of the Caribbean. This means that the small West Indian islands are part of France in line with, for example Burgundy, Alsace and the 25 other regions in mainland France. In addition to Guadeloupe, France has three so-called DOM-ROM or overseas departments and regions, shortened by the Ministry of Regions D'Outre-Mer. The other three are the Caribbean island of Martinique, French Guyana in South America and the island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar. Guadeloupe consists of a number of smaller islands and a dobbeltøy split in Grande-Terre and Basse-Terre with capital of the same name. The two destroyed separated by a narrow channel which is called the salt river. Grande-Terre to the east is relatively flat with savannas and soft hills covered in sugar cane plantations. Basse-Terre is volcanic and however characterized by jagged cliffs and volcanic peaks with dense rain forests that creep up the sides. Guadeloupe's highest point is the 1,467 meter high volcano La Soufrière, which last erupted in 1976.

Guadeloupe was "discovered" by Columbus in 1493, which soon led to the Spanish colonization attempt. But it required a French army before the intractable Carib Indians were exterminated and the islands colonized. The French planted sugarcane in large quantities and transported African slaves who labor for the plantations. Right from the first French settlement in 1635 was the British quite interested in Guadeloupe and occupied the islands several times. A short transition period in the 1800s they were also in Swedish hands. The British occupation led to that slavery was abolished, reinstated and finally abolished in 1848, while Guadeloupe was in French hands. After slavery was abolished, plantation owners had obviously still needs help tending and harvesting sugar cane, and workers from the French colonies in India were "invited" to the Caribbean. This is why today there is a relatively large minority of Indian ancestry Guadeloupe. Otherwise, the vast majority of the 440,000 inhabitants of Guadeloupe Africans and mulattoes. Despite the problems with both the British and the Swedes kept the French the small tropical island, and when the colonies were no longer comme-il-faut, Guadeloupe was converted into a department with an elected Council and senators in Paris. Until February 2007 also heard Saint-Barthélemy and half of the island of Saint-Martin, which is shared with the Netherlands Antilles, Guadeloupe. But it was after a referendum agreed that these two islands, which lies somewhat farther north than the rest of Guadeloupe, should be two separate French kollektiviteter with their own local administration. These two islands belong therefore still under France and the EU, but that is no longer part of the region and the Ministry of Guadeloupe.

Carib Indians' name for Guadeloupe was Karukera, which means "the beautiful waters of the island." That this was a highly appropriate name, they discover people who travel to Guadeloupe. There are plenty of gorgeous sandy beaches, the water is clear and inviting, and very few people can stay completely dry mist during a holiday in Guadeloupe. Whether you want to swim, snorkel or dive, there is a wealth of opportunities. Most beach areas located on the south coast of Grande-Terre. Basse-Terre's most famous and finest beach, the Grande Anse on the north coast. Do you often have a change from the fine white beaches, you can head back to Basse-Terre's south coast and the almost black lava sand there. The other small islands of Guadeloupe has beautiful beaches, which are so far from the concept of "fly paper" that you almost can emerge. But Guadeloupe also offers more physically challenging nature. Guadeloupe National Park covers the entire interior of the island of Basse-Terre and contains archipelago's highest point, La Soufriere and the Eastern Caribbean's highest waterfalls, they respectively 110 and 115 feet tall and picturesque Chutes du Carbet. A network of trails leads nature lovers through the lush rain forest towering mahogany and rubber trees, who willingly lend strains for orchids and other tropeblomster. The city of Basse-Terre Guadeloupe's administrative capital and home to the island's prefecture. The city still seems a little sleepy, and the bustling Pointe-à-Pitre on Grande-Terre Guadeloupe is real main town. It is an exciting mix of old and new, with a aktivitetssydende market on the harbor, several fine museums and a nice central place, Place de la Victorie, in which you can fill with coffee under palm trees and mango trees. The other islands of Guadeloupe is also worth a visit. Terre-de-Haut is the most visited and a mini version of the typical Caribbean island with picturesque villages, gorgeous sandy beaches and nice restaurants. Islands Terre-de-Bas, Marie-Galante and La Désirade is rarely visited by holidaymakers and can provide a good insight into the life of the typical French-Caribbean island - not much has changed here in the last few decades.

 
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